30. December 2010 · Comments Off on Hourdoc.com – Tracking Time & Attendance Using Finger Print Attendance Software · Categories: Management

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27. December 2010 · Comments Off on Johan, An 8 Year Old Malaysian Boy Cycles 250 Km From Pangkor To Penang · Categories: Travel And Leisure · Tags: , ,

Some people say cycling in Malaysia is only for foreigners. Locals find the weather too much. Locals do not use bicycles often. In the kampongs you will see children and some times grow-ups using bicycles. In the cities however, there are fewer bicycles. And, there’s no tradition, like in Holland to take your children out on a bike ride on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon.

My little friends’ name is Johan, he lives with his family in Penang and has visited me a few times. Johan is 8 years old and loves cycling. As I am living in Sitiawan, very near the tourist destination island Pulau Pangkor, Johan and I have been cycling to and from Pulau Pangkor. We also visited some of the surrounding beaches here: Teluk Rubiah, Teluk Batik and even Teluk Senangin which is 24 km away. We cycled at Pangkor island to the Dutch Fort, the Fu Lin Kong temple and even to Pasir Bogak beach.

Preparation

On the 20th November, Johan was brought to Sitiawan by his mother Nazlina. Before we could hit the road we had to do some training. I needed to know what he could handle and how tired he would be at the end of the day.

So I proposed to visit a beach a bit further from home. Johan is not just a good cyclist, he’s also a good swimmer. Teluk Senangin seemed an interesting beach to him and it was 24 km cycling, a good way to find out how he would deal with a more serious distance.

On the way there are three bridges, the third one is a serious climb, even for more experienced cyclist. But Johan had no problems at all. We went to Teluk Senangin, had a swim there. We spend two hours at the beach, swimming.

After two hours, we went to the far end of the beach were the village is. It added an additional few kilometers to the amount we had to do that day. And Johan didn’t get tired.

The first stage, Sitiawan to Pantai Remis

It’s Monday morning and Johan and I wake up to get ready for breakfast and our first stage of the 5 day journey to Penang. We have a nasi lemak at the Home Curry House in Sitiawan. We leave at 9am. Pantai Remis is only 36 km away but it’s not an easy ride. Just out of Sitiawan there are again the three big bridges to conquer. And like the first time we did the bridge when going to Leuk Senangin, Johan didn’t have any problems with the climb.

After the bridge the road is a bit hilly, we take here and there some rest. With the heat in Malaysia, keep drinking is essential here.

Segari is only 8 km from this point. We have a short stop. After the break we cycle to the junction where I want Johan to make a decision either to continue to Pantai Remis, which is another 12 km away or visit the turtle breeding station and the beach. If we choose that, we have to add another 15 km to our day today. Johan wants to see the turtles.

After 7 flat kilometers we arrive at the beach and the turtle breeding station. Johan is very interested and we spend quite some time with the turtles. We have a two hours swim before we take the last 20 km to Pantai Remis where we check in a hotel, have a shower and go out for our dinner. The first day is a success.

The road to Taiping

We stay in Pantai Remis and have a good night sleep. When we leave the hotel the hotel staff is baffled to find out this little boy on his little bicycle will cycle to Taiping and Penang. I can see them thinking I am the most irresponsible person in the world but when they speak with Johan, they find out his excitement.

After nasi lemak breakfast we cycle north. We take the junction east to Beruas, a much nicer and quiet road that brings us closer to the mountains near Taiping. Johan is not at least worried about the mountains he sees in front of him. We spot birds (mostly eagles and kingfishers) and other animals. Johan finds a dead land turtle.

After lunch in Trong, at about 45 km, we get in the hills. We get a few quite serious hills to cross. They are not high but for a boy like Johan serious enough. Johan however doesn’t even look tired when we come up. He has however a bit of fear when it goes down. In the days before he found out he doesn’t like to go faster then about 35 km/h. In our previous bike rides, I have been teaching him how to use the brakes in a way he will not flip over but have all the time good control over his bicycle. Johan exactly how fast he can cycle without getting scared.

Just outside Taiping we are hit by some heavy rain. We take shelter which also gives us the opportunity to repair a little thing on Johan bicycle. By now Johan wants to have his saddle higher. He feels more confident sitting higher.

When the rain stops, we cycle into Taiping, conquering one last bridge which Johan cycles up with 20 km/h. Johan writes in his diary: 62 km.

Parit Buntar

Wednesday is our rest day. It’s the day we invite Johan mom Nazlina and his 4 years old sister Johanna to join us to theTaiping Zoo. My own cycling experience tells me it’s good to leave the bikes a day and do something else. The zoo is great day out and Johan is happy to see his mom and sister.

The next day we are back on the road. We cycle out of Taiping to Kamunting and take the road to Gerik. The mountains come closer but before the climbs start we take the junction to Bagan Serai.

Here some climbing has to be done but Johan cycles like any experienced cyclist. He is not even sweating! On the hills usually he speeds up. His technique is perfect. Though he likes to stand on the pedals, he is not moving his bike. The power of his legs is extremely effective used forwards in the climbing. And for sure, he did not learn this from me as I have a different climbing style (I keep sitting). It’s magical to see this boy doing what he does.

We cross Road 1, a big busy road that runs north south. We can use a new road that leads us over plantations to Kuala Kurau.

We have bad luck, the old ferry to cross the river is no longer running. We have to cycle back, 10 km extra plus the huge bridge that nowadays connect both sides of Kuala Kurau. At the bridge Johan is fascinated by what he sees. Many of the house in Kuala Kurau are build on the water, there’s fishfarms in the middle of the river and fishing boats come and go. Dogs run on the fishfarms too. Johan wonders how they come there.

We have lunch in the town and then cycle to my friend David in Parit Buntar. Johan eats another plate of rice and chicken (it’s his 4th meal that day), checks his speedmeter and tells us he has done 81 km that day. He also wants to know if he can go out with Davids’ two sons and cycle a bit around. Does he eve gets tired, I wonder.

Back home to Penang

David is at the point of leaving to India. He will do a 45 days bikeride journey in south India starting early December 2006. David has a homestay guesthouse where he receives cyclist from all over the world. However, Johan is the second Malaysian cyclist ever visiting his guesthouse and family.

Johan and I cycle on Friday morning away from David and his family. The first kilometers we are able to skip road 1 but after 16 kilometers we have no choice. The last 30 kilometers will be on the big busy road to Penang. There’s no alternative. It’s the least pleasant part of our journey.

In Butterworth everybody, including cyclist, are directed to the motorway. It’s busy and for sure no fun but we make it without any problems to the ferry. At Penang, we have just 10 km left to go back home. Johan finishes his journey at 5 pm on Friday afternoon. He has cycled 250 km, something to be very proud of.

What the story proves is that cycling is mental. Like the story of the man with one arm and one leg Johan shows that cycling has little to do with physical strength, age or sex. Cycling is mental, if you want you can do it.

I am proud I was able to join Johan in his first cycling journey. If there will be a follow up depends fully on Johan. But to be honest, I think he has already in mind what his next cycling journey will be!

Peter van der Lans
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18. December 2010 · Comments Off on The Tribal Tattoo Art · Categories: Arts And Entertainment · Tags: , ,

Tribal tattoos are generally influenced by tribal art from native and indigenous tribes. The tribal tattoo art comes from the older tribes such as the Celtics (Ireland, Scotland, & Wales), the Maori Tribe (indigenous people of New Zealand), the North American Tribal, the African Tribal, the Marquesan (Polynesian inhabitants of the Marquises Islands) and the tribes of Borneo.

Celtic Tattoo Art

Celtic tattoo art come from Ireland. Celtic knot tattoos are some of the most popular and most common designs, featuring loops with no end that symbolize a never ending cycle of dying and rebirth. There are also Celtic cross and animal tattoo designs as well

Mori Tribal tattoo Art

The Maori, the aborigines of New Zealand, call their tribal tattoo “Moko” and Mori art is incredible to behold. To the Maori, a person’s Moko designs enhanced their prestige and show transition from one social status to another. At its highest level, Moko designs proclaimed the sacredness of chieftainship.

North American Tribal Art

There are many Indian tribes in North America and many different traditions for tribal tattooing. It was very common for tattoos to denote rank within the tribe. Take the Illinois Indians for example. It was quite common for weapons of war to be tattooed upon the men and it is suggested by some that the women received tattoos of tools used for labor. The tools of war outranked the tools of labor. This was, to the best of my knowledge, their tradition. They seemingly kept their practices to a minimum.

Samoa Tribal tattoo art

The Samoan tribal tattoo was done with a carved boar tusk, sharpened with a piece of coral, attached to a turtle shell, and then affixed to a stick. This tool is used to carve the designs into the flesh by tapping it against the skin and then a mixture of candle nut soot and sugar water is rubbed into the resulting wound.

Marquesan Tribal tattoo art

Sea-faring Polynesians from Samoa colonized the Marquises Islands as early as 300 A.D. They were warring tribes who sometimes cannibalized their enemies. Marquesan art is very uncommon. Most tribal tattoos are done with one specific object and the size variation is minimal. This is not so with the Pacific.

African Tribal tattoo art

Tribes in Africa do not use pigment for tattooing, they cut the skin and either the wound is packed with a substance so that it becomes raised or it is rubbed with ash or sand until the wound rises up, then the scar is the tattoo.

Borneo Tribal tattoo Art

Borneo is the third largest island in the world. The Dayak people reside here for centuries, they believe that spirits are in everything around them. For this reason they believe that by tattooing an object or creature on them they can draw energy from these spirits.

While the tribal tattoo was originally used to identify members of specific tribes, represent battles fought, and to serve as the symbolization of social status, today tribal tattoo art is a popular fashion. a lot of people today choose various designs simply for aesthetic reasons. Some of the most popular designs include dragon, butterfly and suntribal tattoos. This tattoo can be put virtually anywhere on the body, The back and arms are usually the most common areas where people have them applied, but the ankle, calf, and chest are also used.

The Tribal tattoo art expresses personal freedom and uniqueness of the wearer. Tribal art has a simple appeal that reinforces a positive feeling about ourselves and connects us to ancient mystery of the tribal rituals, which faded away with history.

12. December 2010 · Comments Off on Uncommon Activities Bring New Dimension to Single Women Vacations · Categories: Travel And Leisure · Tags: , ,

With a travel club, you already know you get some of the best vacation and holiday packages available, especially on single women vacations, to some of the most popular travel destinations in the world. But what about when it comes to thinking outside the “normal” travel box? There’s more to travel than just a trip to Hawaii or a few days at the beach, and if you’re a single lady with a passion for sports or a heart for endangered animals, your travel club may have some creative options for single women vacations that you may never have thought of on your own.

Maybe your thing is sports. Sometimes, single women aren’t necessarily thought of when it comes to sports packages, but chances are, if you’re a member of a top travel club, there are some premium sporting event packages just waiting to be explored. Football aficionados can always find something to accommodate their dreams of seeing the Super Bowl in person, and by booking in advance through your travel club, you’ll not only get in on some great rates, but you’ll be able to experience unique perks like one of a kind souvenirs and exclusive seating. Why let the guys get all the gridiron action on their “mancations?”

But it’s not only football you can enjoy on single women vacations. Baseball, basketball, tennis and even the Kentucky Derby are all exciting vacation events, and even if you’ve never considered a trip to Churchill Downs, you might want to think about a jaunt to the races, where you can explore the beauty of Louisiana and its colorful past. Plus, with the travel club you’ll get fantastic seats to the main event!

Another idea you may never have considered as part of a single women vacation is volunteering, and if you’re an animal lover, incorporating some kind of volunteerism dealing with endangered or at-risk animals can allow you the escape of a holiday and the joy of actually contributing to a cause near to your heart.

Animals are in need everywhere, and whether you’re looking to help baby Olive Ridley Turtles make their way to sea in Nuevo Vallarta, Mexico or you’re more comfortable taking at-risk dogs for walks at the Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Kanab, Utah, there’s a spot for you to pour your love of animals into a rewarding travel experience. “Voluntourism” is hot right now, particularly for single women vacations.

Single women vacations, accommodating foot-loose and fancy-free gals hoping to enjoy a week or two away from the daily grind need not be tied down to the “traditional” vacations, as there are so many great places to visit that are often off the radar. How about a tour of Mexico’s wine region. That’s right. Though not well known, Mexico has some lovely wines.

That’s the beauty of a good travel club. Not only do club members receive exclusive prices and deals on transportation and accommodation, for the serious traveler, a travel club allows like-minded single women to travel safely on packages they may never have known existed but that are tailored to their interests and passions. Let vacation be a truly memorable experience again, and let your imagination run wild!

08. December 2010 · Comments Off on Tribal Turtle Tattoo – Tips on Your New Tattoo! · Categories: Arts And Entertainment · Tags: , ,

So you are ready to get a new tattoo and you have decided that you want a tribal turtle tattoo. You are about to put a permanent piece of artwork on your body so make sure you do the proper research before getting your new ink. There are many things to consider before getting a new tattoo, so I hope these recommendations can help.

It is more than likely that you have already gone to Google images to find artwork. The problem with this is that so has everyone else. You are getting a tattoo because you want something unique and you want to stand out. Using artwork that is freely available online is a bad idea.

I would recommend that you check out a tattoo gallery that you have to pay for. The benefits of this are being able to find an artist that specializes in tribal tattoos. With a pay site you can find an artist that will work hand-in-hand with you on your new design. You will also find better quality tattoo galleries than free websites. And you will find a community of like-minded tribal tattoo enthusiasts that will gladly help you out with any questions that you may have.

The other benefit is having access to an updated list of local tattoo galleries. You can find reviews and recommendations of trusted tattoo artists. This alone can save you a lot of headache.

As you can see you have a lot of decisions to make before you get inked. I want to make sure that you find the right tribal turtle tattoo artwork that will make you happy.

03. December 2010 · Comments Off on Express Your Longing for World Peace Through Dance · Categories: Self Improvement · Tags: , ,

Dances of Universal Peace uses dance as a means of reconciliation and fostering peace. Dance can express all human emotions and lead to transcendental states. The Dances of Universal Peace are Sacred Dances which do not require any musical or dance experience. The sessions are about taking part and are not a performance. There are no special costumes. Comfortable clothes are the only requirement. The setting for the dances should have a peaceful, sacred feeling.

A session begins by everyone joining hands and forming a circle with the Dance Leader and musicians in the middle. The Leader then teaches the words, music and movements. The background history associated with that particular dance is explained.

There are more than 400 Dances of Universal Peace drawn from many faiths and traditions. They focus on themes such as Peace in all its contexts, healing of the Earth, it’s peoples, its flora and fauna and in the deeper mysteries.This inclusion of the beliefs of many peoples and religions creates an opening of the heart and a feeling of the brotherhood and sisterhood of all peoples. Performing the dances help the participants to understand and appreciate both the similarities and differences of various religions and cultures.

On the occasions when the dance lyrics include sacred phrases in languages not spoken by the participants the pronunciation of the words is very carefully taught. The majority of dances are only four lines long and are repeated over and over again. The combination of these factors is that the participants learn the songs quickly and easily. Within ten minutes everyone is singing, dancing and sharing the wonderful power of the dances.

The Dances of Universal Peace were collated in the late 1960’s by Samuel L. Lewis (1896-1971) a Sufi teacher and Zen Master. He studied in great depth the mystical traditions of Hinduism, Judaism, and Christianity. Hazrat Inayat Khan and Ruth St. Denis were major influences on his thinking. In the 70’s Lewis began to create the dances as a way of promoting “Peace through the Arts”.The dances celebrate Hinduism, Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Sikhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam as well as the Aramaic, Native American, Native Middle Eastern, Celtic, Native African, and Goddess traditions.

The dances are categorized under headings such as “Dervish Dances.” Dervish Cycle and Allah Snake Dance are examples from this group.There are also “Mantric Dances” such as Hare Rama Hare Krishna Dance and Ram Sita Circle Dance, and “Angelic” dances such as Moon Dances and “Tis the Gift to be Simple” which is a well known Shaker tune.

The dances encompass many moods – love, joy and compassion – as exemplified by the Buddha Qwan Yin,or the extrovert energy of Krishna is expressed in the dance. Individuals experience a dynamic relationship between the group, the individuals within the group and themselves.

Penny Xerri gives an account of “Sharing the Dances with Special Needs Students.” .She writes “One of the delights of working with Special Needs students is the immediacy of their response; if excited, they may jump up and down; if tired sit down; if pleased with themselves they often want to acknowledge that with a round of applause.Perhaps there is a lesson in Zen here. Another pleasure for me is their willingness to experiment, both with sound and movement, no matter how profound their disabilities. (One of our students has virtually no sight, another has speech that is virtually unintelligible and the majority may exhibit obsessive behaviour patterns, such as repetitive speech and movements, if in any way upset.)

Responding to the students’ needs and difficulties in the dances requires that the “able-bodied” offer a variety of support and improvised adaptations. I am fortunate in being supported not only by an accompanist, Ian Salmond, but also by Bill Thompson, a volunteer tutor. Both of these provide a strong male presence and constructive feedback. Additionally, the college in which I work provides “carers” for the students. These carers provide not only student support but exhibit considerable enthusiasm and commitment to the dances.

This level of support makes it feasible to bring the essence of the dances, whilst being very pragmatic with adaptations. These range from simplifying steps, such as substituting a straightforward walk for sidesteps, to including short periods of sitting whilst vocally rehearsing the familiar dances, or learning new ones, as our students tend to tire more quickly than their able-bodied counterparts. On a physical level, we sometimes support the hands of students, whilst adopting gestures or making turns, always being mindful not to “invade”. Challenges we are still working with include keeping the momentum of the dance (there is a tendency for the students to come to a halt after each “round”) and to hold the silence on completion of each dance beyond a few moments.”

In 25 years the Dances of Peace have spread throughout the world. New dance circles are springing up. They help spread feelings of reverence, creativity and a connection to the Earth. The dances are shared in such places as schools, therapy situations, prisons, hospices, rehabilitation centers and by people with physical and mental disabilities. Dance in general is finding a place in the process of Peace and Reconciliation in areas of armed conflict.

Heads of State should be obliged to take part in dances of universal peace before any important conference or meeting!

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